Eco friendly catering & packaging supplies, Eco-lifestyle products & Natural Home-wares

Info: Kitchen & foodware products

  • 1.    Is it easy to make my own yoghurt with the Easiyo yoghurt maker?

    Absolutely! Here's how:

    • Grab your tub from inside the thermos, and half fill with tap water.
    • Open the sachet of yoghurt base, and pour it into the water.
    • Mix in the yoghurt base and top up the tub to the waterline
    • Boil the kettle, and pour boiling water into the thermos, up to the top of the red unit that the tub sits on.
    • Place the tub of yoghurt mixture on top of the red unit.
    • Twist on the thermos lid and leave for at least 12 hours or overnight, and you will have delicious yoghurt!

    What about making yoghurt the old fashioned way, without using the base sachets?

    This is definitely an option as well, it just takes a little more practice and might not turn out as well every time. It's really only a good option if you are able to stay in the kitchen and keep an eye on your warming milk until the process is complete. Here's how:

    • Measure milk to fill your Easiyo tub to just below the waterline, and put into a saucepan
    • Heat the milk until just below boiling, then cool until when you put your (clean) finger into it, it is just above body temperature.
    • Mix in a table-spoonful of active yoghurt base (from your previous batch of yoghurt, or a bought tub of active yoghurt)
    • Boil the kettle, and pour boiling water into the thermos, up to the top of the red unit that the tub sits on.
    • Place the tub of yoghurt mixture on top of the red unit.
    • Twist on the thermos lid and leave for at least 12 hours or overnight, and you will have delicious yoghurt!
    • NB: the pressure points (as they say in MasterChef) are, 1. be careful not to boil the milk over when you heat it. 2. Be careful not to let it cool too much, or you will need to heat it again. These are the things that always catch me out, which is why I use the sachets - they never fail and I never have to clean up scalded milk :)

    (Top)

  • 2.    What is the new Electric style Fowlers Preserving kit like compared to the older style stove top kit?

    The good news is that they are heaps easier and quicker to use! I used to have the older style stove-top one with a thermometer, and it used to take me ages to heat the water at the right rate, to the right temperature. With the new electric systems, you simply pack your jars (more about this later), put them into the unit, turn it on for 1 hr, then turn it off and lift the bottles out - wallah! Pretty easy.

    (Top)

  • 3.    Isn't it really time consuming to preserve fruit & veg?

    Some of the answer to this depends on how you choose to do it. In my grandmothers era, a lot more attention was given to techniques that personally, I don't care about and don't do. Here are some of the things that you could choose to do, and that I don't do and save myself a heap of time with.

    Scalloping of fruit so that it looks really nice.

    This is where you carefully place the stone-fruit halves open side down on top of each other, so that they look nice and neat, and it helps you fit more in the bottle too. Personally I don't bother - I cut them up any which way and throw them in. It's up to you!

    Skinning tomatoes

    Often people skin tomatoes (by dipping them into boiling water and removing the skin, before shopping them). This means you are handling each tomato  individually and takes a bit of time. What do I do? Well, I preserve 80 or 100 kg of tomatoes each year, and I want to get the job done in a day or two. For the bulk of my tomatoes, I wash them, throw them into a blender along with raw onion and garlic, some herbs if I have them and a bit of salt, then I put all the blended mixture into a large sauce pot and heat just until almost boiling. Then I leave it to cool, pour it into my bottles, and preserve in the usual way. This is an amazing ready-made base for all sorts of dishes. With the rest, I wash the tomatoes and chop them roughly, then put them into the bottles with a spoon of salt and a spoon of lemon juice on top, and preserve as usual.

    Making syrup for preserved fruit.

    In my grandparents day a lot more sugar was used, and it was common to make a sugar syrup to preserve fruit in. Often when I preserve stone fruits, they are sweet enough to not need any sugar at all - so I preserve them in water as they are, and the fruit sugar from the fruit transfers into the water. If I think they need a little sweetening, I put a tablespoon of sugar into the top of the bottle before putting the lid on, and the heat from the preserving process blends it all in together. I understand that a little sugar helps the fruit keep their colour - so you might like to add a little for this purpose, if it matters to you.

    (Top)

  • 4.    Can Agreena 3-in-1 wraps go in a microwave?

    Yes, they are microwave safe.

    (Top)

  • 5.    Do you have silicone baking trays?

    No, but we have Agreena silicone wraps, that can be used to line a regular baking tray for non-stick baking.

    (Top)

  • 6.    Can you brand the recycled tyre Stubby Holders?

    Unfortunately, no. They are all completely unique and the edges are not uniform, so it is just too hard. However, we've had customers create a leather wrapper around each stubby older that is etched with their logo, and it looked amazing!

    (Top)

  Loading...